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YFU Blog - Recent stories about Youth for Understanding

Filtering by Tag: Adventure

An Exchange Experience

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For those families who have considered an exchange opportunity, do it! You will quickly realize the world is smaller than you think and that we are more similar than different from one another. Hosting a student is an opportunity you won’t regret with life-long memories made for everyone involved.

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It was the Summer of '70...

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YFU was the beginning of my lifelong love of travel, which continued at Stanford-in-France and in my career as a journalist and international media trainer. Except for my dad's service in World War II, I was the first person in my family to travel overseas since our ancestors came from Europe. The YFU experience literally changed the direction of my life because I was able to experience possibilities beyond the boundaries of my home country, community, and upbringing.

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A Year as a YFU Exchange Student in Germany

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The YFU experience is an open invitation to you. The opportunities are there. It is up to you to make the most of it.

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Campus Ambassador Introductions: Grace

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“Studying abroad allowed me to become much more independent and self driven as well as gave me a passion for travel and an understanding of the importance of international relations.”

As I sit on the curb with my host sister and host aunt, I sing Disney songs quietly to myself to pass the time while waiting for the bus to come to take us home. It is five thirty in the morning and I’ve been up for almost 24 hours consecutively. I am on the verge of an emotional breakdown from exhaustion and culture shock, but in the middle of it I think “Well, this is what you signed up for as an exchange student.”

I had the opportunity to take a trip up to the mountains of Ecuador during my school vacation. I went up to Lake Quilotoa, a volcano crater lake at more than 12,000 feet, and then hiked 12 km back to the hotel.

I had the opportunity to take a trip up to the mountains of Ecuador during my school vacation. I went up to Lake Quilotoa, a volcano crater lake at more than 12,000 feet, and then hiked 12 km back to the hotel.

The YFU Ecuador trip to the Galapagos Islands was a great bonding experience with the other exchange students and the sights were spectacular.

The YFU Ecuador trip to the Galapagos Islands was a great bonding experience with the other exchange students and the sights were spectacular.

This is one of my favorite memories from the ten months I spent in Ecuador because it is such a clear marker of the ways in which my exchange changed me. I had been in country for maybe two weeks when my oldest host sister asked me if I wanted to go with her to a dance that night. It was a Friday so I had gotten up early to go to school and I was already a bit tired. I said yes anyways though because it was a new experience and that is definitely what I got. I had never been to any event even remotely similar and I spent the whole night sitting in a chair on the edge of the dance floor, completely overwhelmed by the intensity of the music and the sheer number of people dancing. I can’t say I enjoyed myself very much on that occasion, but in retrospect I can see it as one of the defining moments of my exchange.

For an art exam, a couple of my friends and I did a presentation as mimes about the day of friendship.

For an art exam, a couple of my friends and I did a presentation as mimes about the day of friendship.

In Ecuador, New Year’s Eve is a bigger holiday than Christmas. At midnight they burn paper mache dolls to symbolize the end of the old year and to welcome in the new. The parties last all night with fireworks, dancing and entertainment.

In Ecuador, New Year’s Eve is a bigger holiday than Christmas. At midnight they burn paper mache dolls to symbolize the end of the old year and to welcome in the new. The parties last all night with fireworks, dancing and entertainment.

Studying abroad allowed me to become much more independent and self driven as well as gave me a passion for travel and an understanding of the importance of international relations. The experiences I had in Ecuador were life changing and I want to help to provide this opportunity for many students in the future.

Manta, Ecuador is located directly on the beach and el Colegio del Pacifico, my school, was a ten minute walk away. One day the juniors and seniors took a field trip down to one of the beaches to do athletic activities.

Manta, Ecuador is located directly on the beach and el Colegio del Pacifico, my school, was a ten minute walk away. One day the juniors and seniors took a field trip down to one of the beaches to do athletic activities.

The school year on the coast of Ecuador runs from February to May so during the break YFU requires students to complete volunteer hours. I did mine at a daycare center in a classroom with children ages one to three years old. It was one of the most fun parts of my exchange; every day the kids made me smile and laugh. I also know a plethora of children’s songs in Spanish.

The school year on the coast of Ecuador runs from February to May so during the break YFU requires students to complete volunteer hours. I did mine at a daycare center in a classroom with children ages one to three years old. It was one of the most fun parts of my exchange; every day the kids made me smile and laugh. I also know a plethora of children’s songs in Spanish.

I lived in the commercial center of Manta, Tarqui, a street market. This picture was taken from the window of my host family’s apartment. There was always noise and traffic at every hour of the day, no matter what.

I lived in the commercial center of Manta, Tarqui, a street market. This picture was taken from the window of my host family’s apartment. There was always noise and traffic at every hour of the day, no matter what.

Greetings from the Khumbu!

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andrew update

andrew update

First update from Andrew Towne from The Khumbu Valley who is climbing Mt. Everest to raise money for YFU. Click here to read more about how Andrew became interested in climbing the world's tallest peaks

Dear Friends,

Here's the brief update:

  • We are five days into the trek to Everest base camp, acclimatizing well and enjoying good weather.

  • The Khumbu Valley and its Sherpa people are inspiring. I've never seen such magnificent mountains and such kind, balanced, and strong people.

Here's the longer update:

It's hard to believe that I've already been in Nepal for a week. We spent our first day in Kathmandu, organizing our gear and visiting the ancient Boudhanath stupa. The next morning, we flew to Lukla, which at 9,300' is at the base of the Khumbu Valley and the head of the ~30 mile trail to Everest base camp. The airport is perched half way up the mountain, with the tail of the runway hanging off a cliff and the head of the runway going directly into the side of a mountain. They say that if the 2,000' of runway isn't enough for a plane to takeoff, pilots just glide over the edge of the cliff and hope to catch an updraft before hitting the valley floor half a mile below. We met the team of Sherpas that is helping us climb the mountain, and after getting our yak caravan organized, we walked a few miles down the trail to Phakding for the night.

On our third day we climbed to Namche Bazaar (11,286'), which is the trading center of the Khumbu Valley. I was amazed to see digital camera dealers and Mountain Hardware outfitters in a place where yaks always have the right of way. Day four took us up to Khumjung village (12,000') and our first view of Mt. Everest. On day five we moved up to Tengboche Monastery--the oldest monastery in the Khumbu, Tengboche served as base camp for Tenzing Norgay and Edmund Hillary's first ascent in 1953. One of the staff at the lodge was a teenager at the time and described to us their intrepid siege of the mountain. Today we climbed a short ridge to aid our acclimatization before attending a Buddhist meditation session at the monastery.

The entire region is incredible; I think because of its people. The Sherpa migrated to the Khumbu from Tibet between 300-600 years ago and make their home in the shadows of the world's tallest peaks. Renowned for their strength and mountaineering prowess, most Sherpa are Buddhist, which may contribute to their tolerance of so many Westerners who lack their mountain skills. The valleys are so steep that "roads" in the Khumbu are hand made trails in valleys and along mountain sides, all shared by humans, yaks and wild animals. I have a great deal of respect for the work it must take to survive at these altitudes, and I am impressed by how global the community is. Many have studied abroad and speak a foreign language. I am proud to be climbing for Youth For Understanding, so that more cultures can learn to view the world through others' eyes.

All in all, the expedition could not be off to a better start. There are 5 others on the trip who will attempt the summit, plus an additional 11 who are just trekking to base camp. We've been enjoying each other's company and playing games / comparing notes on the mountain. When I write again in a week or two, we should be at base camp!

Sincerely,Andrew

Support alumnus Andrew Towne as he attempts to summit Mt. Everest to promote intercultural exchange and raise scholarship funds for YFU!

Andrew holds up a YFU flag atop Carstensz Pyramid, the tallest mountain on the continent of Oceania; July 2011.

Andrew holds up a YFU flag atop Carstensz Pyramid, the tallest mountain on the continent of Oceania; July 2011.

On Top of the World

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Kicking and screaming, 13-year-old Andrew Towne protested his father’s proposal for the family to spend six months in Northern Italy while pursuing a Fulbright Scholarship. After all, Towne would miss the all-important transition to 7th grade, moving from class to class rather than being stuck with the same teacher all day! Six months later, Towne protested even louder, not wanting to come home.This introduction to an unknown place opened Towne’s eyes to the idea of exchange. When his sophomore-year German teacher suggested he apply for the Congress Bundestag Youth Exchange (CBYX) scholarship, it didn’t intimidate him. Towne knew he wouldn’t be able to go on exchange without a scholarship, but when faced with the prospect of studying abroad, he said “it sounded like a great adventure.”

Paired with YFU, Towne experienced the depth of support and learning for which YFU is known. “The first month, I was in East Germany, nine years after the wall fell, living with a farmer in a village of 150 people learning German.” He remembers profound conversations with his East German host father. “My host father had been a young boy when World War II ended. He remembered being greeted by US soldiers when they crossed the Elbe River. When I asked what he thought about ending up under Soviet rule, he shrugged and said, ‘sometimes you get unlucky.’”

Towne learned that he and his host father had another connection. “For the entire time he was living behind the Communist wall, he was grateful that he was close enough to West Germany that he could pick up Johnny Cash on the radio. He loved the fact that my grandfather in Vermont was also a Johnny Cash fan.” Towne reflected, “he took it all in stride. That type of perseverance through 50 years of communism was a real eye-opener.”

Towne credits YFU for challenging him to think critically through facilitating very deep, personal conversations. One such conversation occurred during the week-long, mid-year orientation that is a staple of the YFU experience. Together with fellow U.S. and German exchange students, an alumnus described being assaulted by Neo-Nazis. “He was heartbroken, not so much by the beating, but more by the fact that so many onlookers who could have stopped the fight would look on without doing anything.” Towne continued, “he was a 16-year-old at the time, just like me. He looked us all in the eye and quoted Nietzsche, saying ‘those who are but half-and-half spoil every whole.’” The alumnus challenged his audience to consider action in the face of adversity. “I never forgot this story. It was real. It was tragic. I heard it first-hand.”

The exchange experience changed Towne’s life trajectory from music to foreign affairs. However, his experience returning home fundamentally changed the way he lived his life. “All I wanted to do was talk everybody’s ear off about this great experience I had, but I quickly realized that among teenagers, perhaps no one really wants to see your vacation photos.” Towne began bottling up his great experiences and wondered what others held inside. “I really try to approach everybody with a curiosity about what they are passionate about.” He continued, “Everyone has something — I love finding those things that really light people’s fire. And I attribute that to my exchange year.”

This summer, Towne will summit Mt. Everest to raise money for YFU.

Andrew holds up a YFU flag atop Carstensz Pyramid, the tallest mountain on the continent of Oceania; July 2011.

Andrew holds up a YFU flag atop Carstensz Pyramid, the tallest mountain on the continent of Oceania; July 2011.

“My biggest fear is of heights. Period,” Towne said. “A friend of mine, while I was an exchange student at the University of Nairobi — a choice that was motivated 100% from my YFU exchange year — asked if I wanted to climb Mt. Kenya, the second tallest mountain in Africa.” Towne thought about the physical challenge and considered the opportunity to confront his fear of heights and responded, “that sounds like a great idea!” At that moment, his addiction to climbing began.

Towne’s interest in endurance sports started in Germany. He said, “Before Germany, I thought I would become a professional musician. While there, I started jogging recreationally. And then in college, I walked onto the rowing team.”

Rowing proved to be very challenging from an endurance perspective, and Towne considered quitting many times. Through perseverance, “I learned to trust myself – that when faced with a tough challenge, I wouldn’t give up in the face of pain or difficulty. I grew to relish opportunities to prove that to myself over and over again.”

Now an accomplished mountaineer, having climbed the tallest mountain on five of the seven continents, Asia’s Mount Everest is his next challenge. When asked about the dangers of climbing the world’s tallest peaks, Towne said, “every mountain poses certain risks. On Mount Aconcagua, the tallest mountain in South America, our expedition actually had to step over a body on the trail. Five people died during the two weeks I was on that mountain. On Mt. McKinley, two people died during my second climb. When you are on these mountains, everyone is cognizant of death.” He continued, “I am a very conservative mountain climber. I strongly believe the mountain will always be there, so when it comes to decisions that involve weather or conditions, a lot of climbers get themselves into trouble by pushing themselves when conditions suggest they shouldn’t. I don’t make decisions like that.”

Towne took on his first mountain, Mount Kenya, because “it provided an opportunity to accomplish an endurance feat that involved conquering my fear of heights.” Now he continues to climb “because I love the way it takes me to remote parts of the globe. Mountaineering, like YFU, makes the world feel smaller.”

everest

everest

#myYFU – Instagram Contest

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While it is true that all travel broadens perspective and exposes the traveler to new experiences, when you embarked on the journey of a lifetime with YFU, you became a global citizen. Whether currently on program or even if your exchange was years ago, as a member of the YFU family, you’ve come to discover the best in yourself and your family, forge lifelong connections, and change the way you see the world.

Show us your YFU exchange memories on Instagram using #myYFU  – We want to experience your story!

#myYFU Instagram Contest

#myYFU Instagram Contest

Contest Start Date: Sunday, March 1, 2015Contest End Date: Sunday, March 15, 2015Total Prizes to be Awarded: (1) Grand Prize (Polaroid Cube)Winner Notification: YFU will select a winner and notify them via Instagram Direct Message on (or before) April 1, 2015. Once notified, the winner will have 7 days to respond with their contact information in order to claim their prize.

Eligibility & Rules

  • You must be a current YFU exchange student on program who is from the U.S. and studying abroad with one of our international partners or an international student currently in the U.S. studying abroad with YFU.or

  • You must be a YFU alum who either is from the U.S. and studied abroad with one of our international partners or an international student who studied abroad in the U.S. with YFU.

  • YFU Student/Alumnus must be in photo.

  • Photos can be taken at any time, but only photos submitted using the hashtag #myYFU between March 1-15, 2015 will be eligible.

  • The following factors may impact the judges’ decision on the winner:– YFU in the photo – i.e. student wearing a YFU t-shirt/backpack/poster/etc. or other creative sources such as students forming a Y-F-U, written in sand/chalk or other original means– Number of ‘likes’– Photo narrative

  • Each participant in the contest is responsible for ensuring that he or she has the right to submit the photos that he or she submits to the contest per these rules. Further, by entering, participants agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless YFU, its respective subsidiaries, affiliates, directors, officers, employees, attorneys, agents and representatives, from any and all third party liability for any injuries, loss, claim, action, demand or damage of any kind arising from or in connection with the contest, including without limitation any third party claim for copyright infringement or a violation of an individual’s right to privacy and/or publicity right.

  • The Contest is void where prohibited by law or age restrictions.

  • By participating in this contest and submitting your photo(s) using the hashtag #myYFU you grant Youth For Understanding (YFU) USA irrevocable rights to use your name, photographs, videos, written statements and similar materials for YFU informational and/or promotional purposes. Select photos may be used in various marketing materials to promote YFU exchange.

  • Entries must belong to the submitter.

  • YFU will select a grand-prize winner and notify them by April 1, 2015.

  • Entries must not contain illegal activities and/or material that promotes bigotry, racism, hatred or harm against any group or individual or promotes discrimination based on race, sex, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age.

This contest is sponsored by YFU USA who is solely responsible for the contest and winner selection.

Enter now for your chance to win a Polaroid Cube!

Calling All Basketball Players!

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Lithuania

Lithuania

Has it ever been your dream to play basketball in Europe? To make that free-throw or win the game with a buzzer beating three pointer while the European crowd goes wild. What’s that? You say it’s a dream of yours…? Well then, if you didn’t already know, we’re here to tell you that YFU has a special “slam-dunk” study abroad program designed just for you – okay, not just you but any player who’s interested – to study and compete in Lithuania for an entire year!Lithuania is home to 10 NBA players, has won gold & silver medals in the European Championships, and bronze medals in the Olympic Games. This unique Baltic country has been blessed with beautiful coastline, inland lakes, rich culture and a strong history!

This is an excellent opportunity for you to stand out from other players. Score unique experiences to call upon when drafting your college application letters.

If this sounds like the game of a lifetime to you, check out our website to learn more. Make the first “basket” toward an unforgettable adventure.

This is a very competitive program and spaces are limited so don’t delay. Make a full court press to start your application today!

Help YFU Trailblaze a New Program

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At YFU, we’re always looking for the brave few who are keen to add some new (or even first) stamps to their passport. We need exceptional teens who are eager for a transformative journey where they can learn about the history, people and norms of another culture’s daily life.Do you have?

  • A sense of adventure.

  • Curiosity about the world.

  • Desire to learn about new cultures.

  • An open-mind.

If this sounds like you, then read on for an amazing opportunity!

We have been working with one of our international partners who is very excited to welcome their first American exchange student to their country. That being said… How would you like to be YFU’s first student to study abroad in BULGARIA!

Bulgaria

Bulgaria

Located on the northeastern part of the Balkan Peninsula, this diverse country is at the crossroads between Western Europe, the Near East, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean. With a landscape of rivers, mountains, and sea, this beautiful land is favored with temperate climates that have a subtropical influence. [Note: Click here to see lots of gorgeous user-submitted Flickr photos.]

If you’re ready to embark on the adventure of a lifetime, then your first step is to create a YFU Student Account. Sign-up online or call 1.800.TEENAGE to learn more about this opportunity.

Will you be YFU’s first student to study abroad in Bulgaria?